New Director on the Block?

Countless directors have told me that they spent their first year on a new board learning the ropes. They read, attended, and listened, but they didn’t contribute to board meeting discussions. When they didn’t understand something, they didn’t know whom to ask or when to inquire. They were assured that they would catch on with time.

This weakens the quality of board decision making. If board members have three-year terms, new directors don’t contribute for the first one-third of their term. Some such boards operate short-handed year after year!
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Building Healthy Board Member Relationships

It happens all the time. Individuals sit around the boardroom table making decisions for the organization without getting to really know each other. They aren’t aware of each other’s background or strengths, which in turn constrains their trust, limiting team cohesiveness.
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What Isn’t in the Name?

When you serve your community by sitting on a board, a council, a committee, or a task force, what does the name of the group tell you about your roles and responsibilities? Frequently the name itself tells you very little about your legal obligations or what the organization expects of you. Often the names of these small groups within an organization reflect group titles people have heard elsewhere without full consideration of the intended role of the group.
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Vision & Values are Foundational for Strategic Planning

We were recently asked whether the first step in strategic planning should be developing the organization’s vision or articulating its values. These are both foundational elements of strategic planning with which the leadership must grapple. Vision and values must be aligned with each other, so no matter which is drafted first, it must be revisited after the second is drafted.
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Third Party Facilitator Adds Strategic Value

Determining the organization’s strategic plan may be your leadership team’s most critical responsibility. It is the board’s job to direct the organization’s future and oversee its performance. Thus, the board has the ultimate responsibility for strategic planning – setting the vision, mission, values, priorities, and indicators of success for the years ahead. It is the senior management team’s job to lead implementation, deploying resources in ways that fulfill strategic priorities and achieve strategic goals. Thus, the senior management team is current with operational realities such as competitive pressures, productivity, and implementation hurdles. Therefore, the board can only develop a realistic strategic plan in consultation with the senior management team.
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